GRI index

Web-based report, core option

Content pages: 
Content: 

 

This GRI Index corresponds to Bunge's sustainability content and data provided for the period between January 1, 2018 - December 31, 2018. The web-based GRI report is prepared in accordance with GRI Standards, Core Option, and refers to publicly available information sourced from the Bunge website as well as external reports such as the company's U.S. SEC filings (10-k and associated proxy statements). We report annually on sustainability topics that were identified through the most recent materiality assessment and are what we believe the topics that best represent Bunge's economic, environmental and social performance. 

GRI 102-16, GRI 102-17, GRI 103-2

General Disclosures

Report Section

Organizational Profile

102-1

Name of the organization

Bunge Limited

102-2

Activities, brands, products, services

About Us; Product Quality and Safety

102-3

Location of headquarters

White Plains, New York, USA

102-4

Location of operations

About Us

102-5

Ownership and legal form

Limited Liability Company formed under the laws of Bermuda. We are registered with the Registrar of Companies in Bermuda under registration number EC20791. The company is registered at New York Stock Exchange as BG.

102-6

Markets served

About Us  

102-7

Scale of the organization

About Us

102-8

Information on employees and other workers

Employee Data

102-9

Supply chain

Supply Chain

102-10

Significant changes to the organization and supply chain

10-K

In March 2018 we announced the acquisition of 70% ownership Loders Croklaan

102-11

Precautionary principle or approach

Bunge has policies in place to reduce or avoid negative impacts on the environment where there are threats of serious or irreversible environmental damage. See also our 10-k, and the sections on Assessing and Managing Water Risk and Managing Climate Risk within this report.

102-12

External initiatives

Member Organizations

102-13

Membership of associations

Member Organizations

Strategy

102-14

Statement from senior decision-maker

Message from the CEO

102-15

Key impacts, risks, and opportunities

Message from the CEO

Ethics and Integrity

102-16

Values, principles, standards and norms of behavior

See Code of Conduct

102-17

Mechanisms for advice and concerns about ethics

Code of Conduct

While individuals are encouraged to identify themselves when reporting any issue related to our Code of Conduct, anonymous reports are accepted where local law allows. Bunge promptly responds to all reports of misconduct, and takes remedial action on all substantiated cases.

Reported allegations are grouped into the following categories:

  • Accounting
  • Asset Misappropriation
  • Bribery/Corruption
  • Ethics/Business Integrity
  • Human Resources/Workplace Concerns
  • Legal/Regulatory
  • Safety, Health & Environment
  • Sustainable Sourcing
  • Inquiries

In 2018, 545 cases were reported through various channels including hotline calls, website submittals, and through management. 

Governance

102-18

Governance structure

Governance

102-19

Delegating authority

Governance

102-20

Executive-level responsibility for economic, environmental, and social topics

Governance

102-21

Consulting stakeholders on economic, environmental, and social topics

Materiality and Stakeholder EngagementGlobal Forums and Debates

102-22

Composition of the highest governance body and its committees

Governance

102-33

Communicating critical concerns

Governance

Stakeholder Engagement

102-40

List of stakeholder groups

Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement

102-41

Collective bargaining agreements

Labor & Human Rights

102-42

Identifying and selecting stakeholders

Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement

102-43

Approach to stakeholder engagement

Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement; Global Forums and Debates; Government Relations; Public Policy Advocacy

102-44

Key topics and concerns raised

Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement; UN SDG 17

Reporting Practice

102-45

Entities included in the consolidated financial statements

This report consolidates information from our subsidiary companies. All information is in our full financial report.

102-46

Defining report content and topic boundaries

About This Report; Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement

102-47

List of material topics

Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement

102-48

Restatements of information

none

102-49

Changes in reporting

none

102-50

Reporting period

Calendar year 2018

102-51

Date of most recent report

2018

102-52

Reporting cycle

Bunge considers that the reporting cycle according to GRI standards will be annual.

102-53

Contact point for questions regarding the report

Any questions or comments about this report may be addressed to: sustainability@bunge.com

102-54

Claims of reporting in accordance with GRI Standards

This report has been prepared in accordance with the GRI Standards: Core option

102-55

GRI content index

GRI Index

102-56

External assurance

For the current report, the Company decided not to seek external assurance, considering the complexity of operations in different countries where Bunge operates. The option to include external assurance will be considered for the next report, depending on stakeholder feedback.

Management Approach

103

Management Approach

See table in Materiality and Stakeholder Engagement for location of management approaches for each material topic.

103-2

The management approach and its components

Sustainability requirements are becoming increasingly demanding in our market, and food and agribusiness suppliers such as Bunge are asked to meet a range of criteria across multiple stakeholder groups.

Bunge’s sustainability performance is usually vetted by our customers, by sector roundtables and criteria, and by NGOs. In addition, our operating companies may be audited by customers from time to time and are also subject to other third-party audits related to product quality and sustainability criteria, depending on market needs. During 2018 there were no records of non-compliance with customer standards. Several of Bunge units are also certified by SEDEX, increasing the interaction and transparency with global customers. SEDEX (Supplier Ethical Data Exchange), is a non-profit organization committed to ensuring ethical performance throughout all value chains. This organization, through its SMETA audit (SEDEX Members Ethical Trade Audit), allows buyers to approach sustainable sellers in order to generate ethical business relationships and product safety, focusing the needs of the increasingly diversified and demanding global markets.

In 2018, there were no material findings as a result of these reviews.

Material Disclosures

Report Section

Economic Performance

201-1

Direct economic value generated and distributed

10-k

201-2

Climate change financial implications

10-k; ClimateIndustrial Savings

Energy

302-1

Energy consumption within the organization

Climate; Emissions and Energy Data

302-2

Energy consumption outside of the organization

Emissions and Energy Data

302-3

Energy intensity

Climate

302-4

Reduction of energy consumption

Emissions and Energy Data; Industrial Savings

Water

303-1

Water withdrawal by source

Water Data

303-2

Water sources significantly affected

Water

303-3

Water recycled and reused

Water Data; Industrial Savings

Biodiversity

304-1

Sites near areas of high biodiversity value

Sustainable Agriculture

304-2

Impacts on biodiversity

Sustainable Agriculture

304-3

Habitats protected or restored

Sustainable Agriculture

Emissions

305-1

Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions

Climate; Emissions and Energy Data

305-2

Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions

Climate; Emissions and Energy Data

305-3 Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions Climate; Emissions and Energy Data

305-4

GHG emissions intensity

Climate

305-5

Reduction of GHG emissions

Climate; Emissions and Energy Data; Industrial Savings

Effluents and Waste

306-1

Water discharge by quality and destination

Water Data

306-2

Waste by type and disposal method

Waste

306-4

Transport of Hazardous Waste

Waste

Employment

401-1

New employee hires and employee turnover

Employee Data

Occupational Health and Safety

403-1

Worker health and safety committees

Health & Safety

403-2

Injury and absenteeism rates

Health & Safety

Training and Education

404-1

Average hours of training per year per employee

Employee Training

404-2

Programs for upgrading employee skills

Employee Training

404-3

Performance and career development reviews

Employee Training

Diversity and Equal Opportunity

405-1

Diversity of governance bodies and employees

Diversity and Inclusion

Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining

407-1

Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk

Labor & Human Rights

Child Labor

408-1

Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labor

Labor & Human Rights

Forced or Compulsory Labor

409-1

Operations and suppliers with risks for forced labor

Labor & Human Rights

Human Rights Assessment

412-1

Operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments

Labor & Human Rights

412-2

Employee training on human rights policies or procedures

Our Global Labor Policy

Local Communities

413-1

Local community engagement

Social Responsibility

Supplier Social Assessment

414-1

New suppliers that were screened using social criteria

Labor & Human Rights; Public Policy Advocacy

414-2

Negative social impacts in the supply chain and actions taken

Labor & Human Rights

Customer Health and Safety

416-1

Assessment of health and safety impacts

Product Quality & Safety

416-2

Incidents of non-compliance concerning the health and safety impacts of products and services

Product Quality & Safety

Marketing and Labeling

417-1

Requirements for product and service information and labeling

Product Quality & Safety

 

Product Quality, Safety and Nutrition

Product Quality & Safety

Throughout our value chains, we adhere to leading standards for product quality and safety. We help ensure our products’ quality and safety through several means, including:

  • Traceability on multiple levels for our raw material
  • Product safety and quality certifications in place for several operating sites (GMP, HACCP, ISO 9001-2008, ISO 14000, OHSAS 18001, FSSC 22000)
  • Adherence to regulations
  • Label-approval verifications where applicable

Like the global agribusiness and food industry as a whole, we are focused on the complex, extensive and ongoing process of eliminating contaminants from the value chain. During this reporting period, Bunge had no issues of regulatory non-compliance concerning product quality and safety.

GRI 102-2, GRI 103-2, GRI 416-1, GRI 416-2, GRI 417-1

Nutrition

Nutritious food supports human health, which is the basis of human well-being and development. Grains and oilseeds, specifically, account for more than 50 percent of the available calories in the global food supply today. Bunge enhances the nutritional profile of diets around the world with our oilseeds and grains and through the fortified foods we produce.

Nutritious Oils & Grains

Soybean, canola, rapeseed and sunflower oils are among the richest dietary sources of polyunsaturated fat and omega-3 and omega-6 fats, all of which have known health benefits. Whole grains are rich in fiber, which is associated with a reduced risk of diabetes and heart disease. Whole grains also provide minerals such as iron, magnesium and zinc, as well as B vitamins. Gluten-free grains, such as quinoa, millet and sorghum are a good source of nutrients. Bunge is a leading company in the global trade of grains, providing nutritious raw materials around the world.

Making Nutrition Available Globally

With an integrated value chain that stretches from farm to fork, Bunge is well positioned to deliver safe, affordable and nutritious grains and oilseeds around the world. Our fortified margarines, enriched oils and omega-3 blends supply nutrients and other benefits that are needed for human health and that reduce disease risks.

Healthier Diets for Children

In Argentina, 6 out of 10 children live in poverty, resulting in malnutrition, obesity and a lack of healthy living conditions. Since 2010, Bunge in Argentina has been committed to improving children’s health and access to healthy diets in the communities where it operates, aligning itself with two of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: #2: Zero Hunger and #3: Good Health and Wellbeing.

Bunge, along with several prestigious local NGOs and public organizations, developed nine CSR programs that were implemented in seven communities. Each implementation required an open and coordinated dialogue with many public actors including city halls, government ministries, hospitals and schools, among others. The main goal was to provide the communities with both the knowledge and tools to address childhood malnutrition, obesity and health. Bunge continues to partner with these communities, developing their tailored programs and enabling them to progress towards their goals. Bunge’s most significant programs include the following: Learning How to Eat at Kinder, Teacher’s Nutrition Seminars and Good Nutritional Practices. The measurable achievements for 2017-2018 were:

  • More than 100 teachers trained
  • More than 30 urban and rural schools participated
  • 2 hospitals involved
  • More than 1,500 children from 0 to 12 years old benefited
  • More than 410 persons received medical treatment
  • 6 research studies carried out, resulting in the release of 4 papers
  • A recognition from Avia Terai City Hall
  • Support from 7 City Halls
  • An organic garden and a traveler recipe book

 

 

Waste

Waste Data

Landfills are a major public health and environmental concern for several reasons, including that compacted organic material in landfills releases methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, and that toxins in discarded waste can leach into soil and groundwater. Bunge is committed to a future of zero waste sent to landfills as well as to reaching a 100 percent waste-recycling rate at our factories.

As part of our new environmental goals for 2016 and beyond, we have approved new waste reduction and recycling targets and are developing programs to achieve them. We’re seeking to reduce the amount of waste we generate by 20%, per ton of production, by the end of 2026.

GRI 103-2

2018 Non-hazardous Waste (in metric tons)

Waste Disposition

Amount

Landfill disposal

37,532

Composting

19,350

Land farming

5,361

Physical or chemical treatment

4,038

Incineration — without energy recovery

231

Incineration — with energy recovery

7,645

Fertilizer

27,854

Biogas production

35,656

Recovery

35,733

Reuse

22,738

Recycling

54,816

On-site storage

1,063

Another treatment

2,558

Total non-hazardous wastes

254,575

Total non-hazardous wastes (2017) 230,374

 

2018 Hazardous Waste (in metric tons)

Waste Disposition

Amount

Incineration

308

Hazardous landfill disposal

1,210

Recycling

4,467

Recovery

7,388

Reuse

658

Land farming

0

On-site storage

87

Total hazardous wastes

14,118

Total hazardous wastes (2017)

12,103

Total weight of waste (hazardous and non-hazardous)

268,693

Total weight of waste Hazardous and non-hazardous (2017)

242,476

GRI 306-2, GRI 306-4

 

 

Emissions

Emissions and Energy Data

2018 Scope 1 & 2 GHG Emissions

Direct (Scope 1) emissions from fuel use in facilities

1,666,056

Indirect (Scope 2) emissions from purchased energy

1,600,008

Biogenic CO2 emissions

5,550,386

GRI 102-8, GRI 401-1, GRI 405-1

GHG Emissions 2015-2017

 

2015

2016 2017

Direct (Scope 1) emissions

1,694,967

1,663,890 1,722,634

Indirect (Scope 2) emissions

1,729,080

1,726,566 1,549,444

Energy Consumption

Direct Energy (in gigajoules, GJ)

Non-renewable sources (38%)

Natural gas

26,660,056

Gasoline

4,535

Light oil

25,647

Diesel

220,116

Fuel oil/heavy oil

20,920

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)

208,848

Coal 2,120,866
Renewable sources (62%)

Wood or wood waste

5,834,658

Seed hulls

4,449,456

Other primary solid biomass

2,087,897

Sugar cane waste

35,216,002

Total direct energy consumption

76,849,000

Total direct consumption (2017)

79,441,726

Indirect Energy (in megawatt-hours, MWh)

Total electricity consumption purchased

2,181,577

Purchased steam

1,020,657

Total indirect energy consumption

3,202,252

Total indirect consumption (2017)

3,277,371

Electricity sold

722,509

% of consumed energy from the grid 65%

GRI 302-1, GRI 302-2

2018 Scope 3 GHG Emissions (in Metric Tons)

Emissions Category

Total Emissions

% of Total

Purchased goods and services

42,973,908

42.38%

Capital goods

5,550,386

0.10%

Fuel and energy-related activities

1,770.069

1.75%

Upstream transportation and distribution

6,036,300

5.95%

Waste generated in operations

7,241

0.01%

Business travel

6,782

0.01%

Employee commuting

32,128

0.03%

Upstream leased assets

85,442

0.08%

Downstream transportation and distribution

2,738,708

2.70%

Processing of sold products

28,505,643

28.11%

Use of sold products

215,217

0.21%

End-of-life treatment of sold products

15,628,727

15.41%

Investments

44,621

0.04%

Total Scope 3 Emissions

98,141,289

 

Scope 3 Methodology

For 2018, Bunge used the GHG Protocol Corporate Value Chain Accounting and Reporting Standard. The standard categorizes Scope 3 emissions into 15 distinct categories. This provides companies with a systematic framework to understand and report Scope 3 activities. Data used was sourced internally within Bunge. Where possible primary data (mass, distance, energy) has been collected directly from supplier or internal business units within. If primary data is not available, then secondary data (spend data, extrapolations, benchmarks) were used to calculate greenhouse gas emissions. Where the percentage of primary data was low, the uncertainty of the emissions totals calculated increases. Due to the lack of actual data from commodity farms and suppliers, there is large uncertainty surrounding emissions from purchased commodities (within Category 1 purchased goods and services). Using cradle-to-grave emission-factors and Bunge’s sourcing policies, we have calculated a reasonable emissions total applying the most suitable emission factors to the best of our knowledge.

 

Water

Water Data

Water Withdrawals for 2018 (in cubic meters)

Total volume of fresh surface water withdrawn

34,764,137

Total volume of ground water withdrawn

11,540,405

Total volume of rainwater collected directly and stored by the organization

0

Total volume of waste water from another organization, used for Bunge supply

0

Total volume withdrawn from municipal water supplies or other public or private water utilities

9,713,896

Total volume of sea water withdrawn

43,473,950

Total volume of water withdrawn

99,492,389

Total volume of water withdrawn (2017) 97,146,857

GRI 303-1, GRI 303-3

Water Discharges in 2018, by destination (in cubic meters)

Total volume of fresh surface water discharged

12,296,037

Total volume of brackish water discharged

43,473,950

Total volume of groundwater discharged

185,752

Total volume of waste water from other sources

 

46,420

Total volume discharged to municipal sources

5,595,831

Total volume of water discharged

61,597,991

Total volume of water discharged (2017) 56,016,140

GRI 306-1

Industrial Savings

Industrial Savings

The company continues to assess relevant data regarding savings and innovations in our industrial operations. The intention is to understand how much the decrease in emissions, energy use and waste generation represent in financial savings for Bunge, globally. Analysis show that, for the period of 2016-2018, industrial sustainability efforts resulted in savings of over US$36.5 million for the global Agribusiness and Food & Ingredients segments.  

2018 savings from reductions in water use, GHG emissions and waste (in USD, for global operations):

 

2018 Savings

Agribusiness (soy, rape, sunflower operations)

$6,816,899

Food & Ingredients

$3,188,938

Total cost savings

$10,005,837

Total cost savings (2017) $26,502,134

GRI 201-2

 

 

Employee Data

Employee Data

External Hire 

By Age

External Hire Rate (2018, All Ages)

 

External Hire Rate

External Hires

Average Headcount

All Ages

15.8%

5,077

32,198

   <20

99.5%

328

330

   20-29

34.1%

2,286

6,696

   30-39

14.1%

1,592

11,307

   40-49

8.3%

629

7,601

   50-59

4.3%

211

4,894

   60+

2.0%

28

1,368

   Unallocated

102.5%

3

3

By Gender

External Hire Rate (2018, By Gender)

 

External Hire Rate

External Hires

Average Headcount

All Genders

15.8%

5,077

32,198

Male

16.6%

4,279

25,758

Female

12.4%

798

6,440

By Region

External Hire Rate (2018, All Operating Company)

 

External Hire Rate

External Hires

Average Headcount

All Operating Company

15.8%

5,077

32,198

   BAS

24.1%

509

2,111

   BBR

17.2%

2,675

15,527

   BEMEA

11.8%

870

7,343

   BMSI

10.9%

31

284

   BNA

17.7%

840

4,754

   BPL

7.9%

21

265

   BSC

6.8%

131

1,914

 

Turnover rate

By Gender

Turnover Rate (2018, All Genders)

 

Termination Rate

Terminations

Average Headcount

All Genders

27.2%

8,742

32,198

   Male

27.8%

7,169

25,758

   Female

24.4%

1,573

6,440

By Age

Turnover Rate (2018, All Ages)

 

Termination Rate

Terminations

Average Headcount

All Ages

27.2%

8,742

32,198

   <20

100%

332

330

   20-29

45.6%

3,054

6,696

   30-39

24.4%

2,760

11,307

   40-49

18.3%

1,388

7,601

   50-59

13.9%

682

4,894

   60+

38.4%

525

1,368

   Unallocated

n/a

 

 

By Region

Turnover Rate (2018, All Operating Company)

 

Termination Rate

Terminations

Average Headcount

All Operating Company

27.2%

8,742

32,198

   BAS

32.0%

675

2,111

   BBR

32.8%

5,095

15,527

   BEMEA

14.6%

1,073

7,343

   BMSI

20.4%

58

284

   BNA

23.8%

1,133

4,754

   BPL

22.3%

59

265

   BSC

33.9%

649

1,914

 

Employee Diversity

*For full time employees in 2018

By Gender

 

2018

Percentage

All Genders

32,198

 

   Male

25,758

80%

   Female

6,440

20%

By Age

 

2018

Percentage

All

32,198

 

<20

330

1%

20-29

6,696

21%

30-39

11,307

45%

40-49

7,601

24%

50-59

4,894

15%

60+

1,368

4%

Misc

3

0%

 

 

External Engagement

Member Organizations

Bunge is a member of many organizations globally, supporting local development and working toward a more sustainable agribusiness and food industry. Below, some of Bunge’s major interactions are highlighted.

  • ABIA (Brazilian Association of the Food Industries) -  Board Member
  • ABIOVE (Brazilian Association of Vegetable Oils Industries) – Chair of the board
  • ASAGA (Argentinian Association of fats and oils) - Board Member
  • CAPPRO (Paraguayan Chamber of Cereals and Oilseeds Processors) – Board Member
  • CIARA (Argentinian Oil Industry Chamber) – Board Member
  • COCERAL (European association representing the trade in vegetable oils and fats and agrosupply) - Board Member
  • EBB (European Biodiesel Board) - Board member
  • ELMA (European Lecithin Manufacturers)
  • ESMC (Ecosystems Services Market Consortium) - Founding Member
  • EUFIC (EU Food Information Council)
  • FEDIOL (the European Union vegetable oil and protein meal industry association)- Board Member
  • Field to Market – Founding Member
  • Agriculture Future of America - Board Member
  • National Future Farm of America Foundation - Board Member
  • National Black Growers Council - Corporate Advisory Board Member
  • SASB (Sustainable Accounting Standards Board) - Advisory Panel Member
  • Future Farmers of America - Board Member
  • ISCC (International Sustainability and Carbon Certification)
  • RSPO (Roundtable for Responsible Palm Oil)
  • SAI (Sustainable Agriculture Initiative)
  • Ship Recycling Transparency Initiative
  • Sustainable Shipping Initiative
  • United Nations Global Compact
  • UNICA (União da Indústria de Cana-de-Açúcar)
  • USSEC - U.S. Soybean Export Council
  • World Business Council on Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

Bunge has become more active in industry associations, as an opportunity to address topics related to sustainability, to leverage our position within the industry, and to promote better communication with government agencies. We advocate for our point of view with associations and various governmental departments, sharing any concerns we may have about the effects of regulations on our business and society.

GRI 102-43

 

Global Forums and Debates

Being active at public events has proven to be an important way to engage with stakeholders, present our perspective and collect feedback. These were the main events at which Bunge served as speaker in 2018:

  • New York Climate Week Dow Jones Sustainability Conference, New York City - Panelist
  • AAPRESID Sustainability Forum, Argentina - Panelist
  • Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) In Person Conference, San Francisco - Presenter
  • HSBC Low Carbon Economy Conference - Panelist
  • Regenerative Earth Summit - Panelist
  • Global Environment Fund Roundtable on Sustainable Agriculture Financing - Panelist
  • Sustainable Agriculture Financing Roundtable, hosted by WWF and British Government - Panelist
  • IDH Sustainable Trade Conference - Participant
  • Innovation Forum Landscape Conference, London - Panelist
  • CDP Supply Chain Summit, Las Vegas, NV - Panelist
  • Harvard University Latin American Conference, Boston, MA - Panelist
  • CDP Forest Webinar - Speaker
  • Future of Food Conference, Chicago - Panelist
  • Global Forest Watch Summit, Washington, D.C. - Panelist
  • The Forest Alliance Summit, Bogota, Colombia - Panelist

GRI 102-21, GRI 102-43

 

Government Relations

In each of the countries where we operate, Bunge is subject to a variety of laws that govern various aspects of our business, including:

  • The processing, handling, storage, transport and sale of our products
  • Risk management activities
  • Land use and ownership of land, including laws regulating the acquisition or leasing of rural properties by certain entities and individuals
  • Environmental, health and safety matters

To operate our facilities, we must obtain and maintain numerous permits, licenses and approvals from governmental agencies, and our facilities are subject to periodic inspection by governmental agencies. In addition, we are subject to other laws and government policies affecting the food and agriculture industries, including:

  • Food and feed safety
  • Nutritional and labeling requirements
  • Food security policies

Our Interactions

Our relationships with government agencies and policy makers vary from country to country, and are usually related to production, marketing, regulations, compliance, sustainability and trade. Specifically in the European Union, sustainability began to be a strong strategic priority more than a decade ago. Bunge has an office in Brussels, where we interact with different departments of the European Commission, including those related to the environment, agriculture, product regulations, trade and energy. We also engage with members of the European Parliament.

In these relationships, we are asked for information about our business and we are able to explain how our industry works. Similar interactions take place out of Bunge’s Washington, D.C., office. For other regions, our dialogue with government agencies and policy makers is managed by our local headquarters in the countries in which we work. Regardless of region, we strive for consistency in our discourse across global and local interactions.

GRI 102-43

 

Public Policy Advocacy

We seek to influence public policy on bioenergy through direct engagement with policy makers and participation and active governance roles in the trade associations FEDIOL, ABIOVE and UNICA.  We report avoided emissions to the CDP Climate Change program for our low-carbon products: ethanol, biofuel, biomass and bioelectricity.

GRI 102-43

In 2018, Bunge, along with four other companies, were accused of purchasing soybeans allegedly produced in an area embargoed by IBAMA, the Brazilian environmental agency. The amount sourced by Bunge represents less than 10% of the total amount identified by IBAMA as allegedly purchased under embargo. Regardless of amount, however, we have disputed the allegations and have filed a formal legal response with IBAMA, contesting its findings and providing Bunge’s proper control documentation indicating that our contracts were with a farm and farmer that were not embargoed by IBAMA according to public records. We look forward to resolving the situation as soon as possible.

Where material we screen suppliers using social-environmental criteria. The chart below presents the result of the screening in Brazil, related to public policy advocacy and commitments to enhance our supply chain in the country:

Farmers disqualified due to non-compliance with basic sustainability criteria in Brazil in 2018

 

Blocked by December 2018

Illegal Deforestation (Ibama)

386

Illegal Deforestation (State of Para)

174

Amazon Soybean Moratorium

177

Modern Slavery Labor issues

10

Total Blocked

747

GRI 414-1