Climate

Adapting to a changing world

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Agriculture, Trade & Climate

Around 15% of global GHGs are related to agricultural production. That number is higher when you consider forestry and land use change. As climate change affects rainfall and temperature, the location and nature of crop systems are likely to change. We believe that our sector will need to adapt. At the same time, global population is expected to grow significantly – and food supplies must keep up.

To ensure Bunge is ready, we are expanding our asset network and product portfolio to ensure diversity of supply, reducing emissions in our own operations and working to integrate climate scenario analysis more fully into our long-term planning and risk management.

At the same time, agricultural trade will serve as an important tool for adaptation and resilience. As the global map of agriculture changes, trade will help address supply shocks and maximize total environmental efficiency. Agribusiness and food companies need to plan for increased food production and less food waste, to help feed 9.5 billion people by 2050. Bunge is helping to bolster global food security on several fronts. We are investing in new facilities, working to increase the efficiency and integration of our supply chains, and addressing the operational risks posed by climate change.

GRI 103-2

As the global map of agriculture changes, trade will help address supply shocks and maximize total environmental efficiency.

 

Energy Use & Emissions Reduction

In 2017, Bunge continued to pursue a variety of energy-efficiency programs, including the launch of our Energy Optimization Program that enables real-time monitoring and analysis of energy consumption to drive improvements.  This multi year program will cover 55 facilities worldwide by 2020.

We use renewable energy, including sunflower husks and biomass, when possible. We are a leading producer of ethanol in Brazil, where our sugarcane mills run on and produce renewable energy. As of December 31, 2017, our total installed cogeneration capacity was about 322 MW, with approximately 131 MW available for resale to third parties after supplying our mills’ energy requirements.

Between 2015 and 2017, we reduced CO2 emissions intensity by 6.5%, from 47.66 to 44.57 kg per metric ton of production. We have established new intensity goals to reduce both energy consumption and GHG emissions per ton of production by 10% by 2026, compared to a 2016 baseline.

You can learn more about our GHG footprint, risks, plans and reduction efforts in our CDP submissions.

GRI 103-2, GRI 302-4, GRI 302-5, GRI 305-5

Energy Use & Emissions Reduction

In 2017, Bunge continued to pursue a variety of energy-efficiency programs, including the launch of our Energy Optimization Program that enables real-time monitoring and analysis of energy consumption to drive improvements.  This multi year program will cover 55 facilities worldwide by 2020.

We use renewable energy, including sunflower husks and biomass, when possible. We are a leading producer of ethanol in Brazil, where our sugarcane mills run on and produce renewable energy. As of December 31, 2017, our total installed cogeneration capacity was about 322 MW, with approximately 131 MW available for resale to third parties after supplying our mills’ energy requirements.

Between 2015 and 2017, we reduced CO2 emissions intensity by 6.5%, from 47.66 to 44.57 kg per metric ton of production. We have established new intensity goals to reduce both energy consumption and GHG emissions per ton of production by 10% by 2026, compared to a 2016 baseline.

You can learn more about our GHG footprint, risks, plans and reduction efforts in our CDP submissions.

GRI 103-2, GRI 302-4, GRI 302-5, GRI 305-5

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Emissions  & Energy Intensity  

2017 Emission Intensity (Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions)

44.572 kg CO2e/metric ton

2017 Energy intensity ratio

1.2 gigajoules/mt

Organization-specific metric chosen to calculate the ratios

73,410,376 metric tons

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Managing Climate Change Risks

Climate change poses acknowledged risks for Bunge. First, future additional regulations or taxation of GHG emissions, or policies related to national emission-reduction plans, could affect costs for our business. And second, adverse weather, including as a result of climate change, could affect the availability and price of agricultural commodities and products as well as our operations and results.

These same possibilities could also create opportunities for our business. They could result in a greater demand for our crops grown in unaffected regions. The effects of climate change could also present opportunities to leverage our global asset network to meet demand in times of shortages.

GRI 102-11, GRI 103-2, GRI 201-2

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Notes on Data

Bunge collects activity data and calculates Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions using the Brazil GHG Protocol Programme, the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006), and the U.S. EPA Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule; national sources such as the U.S. EPA, the Argentine Secretary of Energy, and the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology; and local sources. Our inventory boundaries are determined based upon operational control.

Energy intensity calculations include fuel, electricity purchased, steam purchased and energy sold out.

GRI 302-3, 305-1, 305-2, 305-4